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How to Cook Perfect Rib-Eye Steak

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How to Cook Perfect Rib-Eye Steak

How to Cook the Perfect Rib-Eye Steak 

The First in Our New ‘How to Cook’ Series 

  

At Eversfield Organic, we’re always thinking of new ways to educate and share helpful content with our customers. We also pride ourselves on our 100% grass fed and finished, organic meat and wide range of organic produce. With this in mind, it seems the natural next step is to combine the two and create a new series, exploring and explaining the best ways to cook some of our signature organic food.  

  

With our recent Gold Win at the Taste of the West Awards for our 28 Day Dry Aged Beef Rib-Eye Steak (we’re thrilled to say the least!), How to Cook the Perfect Rib-Eye Steak is a great place to start…  

 

Going for Gold 

We pride ourselves on selling the highest quality organic meat, which is why we’re so chuffed to announce our recent Gold Award from the Taste of the West for our organic beef rib eye steak. Our organic beef is always 100% grass fed and finished, freshly trimmed by our expert butchers on our organic farm in Devon.  

  

Our award-winning organic rib eye steaks are taken from the forequarter of the cattle next to the sirloin and hung for a minimum of 28 days. Most noticeable is the beautiful marbling throughout all of our grass fed rib eye steaks, an award-winning attribute to all our Aberdeen Angus beef. This eye-catching marbling is created by feeding our herd of heritage Aberdeen Angus cattle only pasture, even during the winter months. Working with nature and allowing our herd to live the most natural life possible ensures the highest standards of animal welfare as well as producing a truly meaty, tasty cut of organic beef 

 

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 How to Cook Steak 

For the start of our ‘How to Cook’ series, we thought we’d begin with a classic, simple dish: the perfect grass-fed, organic steak. We headed over to the Dartmoor Inn, Merrivale to chat to our head chef and uncover his top secrets for creating the ever-so-mouth-watering steak that we serve at the inn. Get ready to impress with your new culinary skills at all the summer BBQs with this simple steak recipe. 

 

The Method: 

 

  1. Allow the Steak to Come to Room Temperature

Leave the steak out of the fridge for approximately 10 to 15 minutes before you're ready to cook. Giving the meat time to come to room temperature allows for a more even cook all the way through. If your meat is cold when it hits the grill, it can cause the muscle fibres to tense up. 

  

  1. Heat Up Your Coals

Light the charcoal on your barbeque and wait until the coals turn white before cooking. This will take approximately 10 to 15 minutes. 

  

  1. Oil the Steak

Rub a generous amount of oil into the meat to ensure that perfect outer texture once cooked and, of course, so it doesn't stick.  

CHEF'S TOP TIP: Use Beef Fat for your oil. 

  

  1. Season the Steak

The best way to do this is to sprinkle with salt on both sides immediately before popping on the barbeque. Our chef likes to add a sprig of fresh Rosemary too. 

  

  1. Cooking Times

Pop your steak on the grill and sear for 4 to 5 minutes each side for medium rare. You can cook for few less or more minutes depending on how you prefer your steak cooked. 

  

  1. Don't Forget To Rest

This is the final but most important step for your perfect tender steak, and it gives you time to dish up your sides and pour your wine! Rest for 10-15 minutes. 

 

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Timings are based upon a 10oz Steak 

  

  

Add an organic, grass fed beef rib eye steak from our online butchery to your next online organic grocery delivery and try out our method. You can also come along to the Dartmoor Inn to have a truly foodie experience and have your steak cooked for you. Our Inn also makes for a perfect night-away in the midst of Dartmoor National Park. 

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  • Libby Long